Tuesday, May 02, 2017

Extra-Credit Opportunity – POLSC 1 (Spring 2017)



EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY

As noted in the syllabus, students who’ve completed the REVEL online quizzes (and related assignments) are eligible for extra-credit points toward the semester grade. To be eligible, students must have completed their weekly readings on REVEL, along with the online assessment quizzes, since the purchase of the textbook. If interested, students should complete a 2-3 page self-assessment report (in Microsoft Word, double-spaced with 10- or 12-point font, Times New Roman). First, simply summarize your progress on REVEL over the semester. What are your average scores on the REVEL chapter quizzes, for example, and how has your performance on the quizzes improved over time? Second, provide a critical analysis (that means criticism and evaluation) of the REVEL online learning technology. This is your chance to vent: What did you like about it? What didn’t you like about it? How could it be improved? What other uses of REVEL would you like to see, for example, classroom exercises, etc.? That’s it. Students can submit their extra credit reports at any time up to their fourth midterm examination. (May 17th for MW classes and May 18th for T-TH classes. I won’t be able to accept extra-credit after the fourth midterms, because I’ll be overloaded with all kinds of end-of-semester responsibilities).

Also, since a lot fewer students purchased the REVEL digital textbook this semester, I’m also making a general extra-credit opportunity available for all students (you can do one or the other, but not both). So, for this opportunity students are to write a 3-4 page “reaction paper” on free speech on campus. Specifically, students will watch in class the Prager University video, “Does Free Speech Offend You?” And students will read Ulrich Baer’s op-ed at the New York Times, “What 'Snowflakes' Get Right About Free Speech.” Who is right? Left-wing social justice warriors won't let certain conservative personalities speak on campus, often infringing real, constitutionally-protected speech. Something’s got to give. Should colleges and universities have the right to ban certain dissenting viewpoints on campuses? Is there a valid or compelling constitutional or philosophical basis for doing so? There’s no necessary right or wrong answer here. The point is for students to be able to write and reason through the issues. (For background, you may also refer to Nathan Heller’s essay at the New Yorker, “The Big Uneasy. What's Roiling the Liberal-Arts Campus?” (Available online.) Again, there's no specific due date. Students can submit their extra credit at any time up to their fourth midterm examination. (May 17th for MW classes and May 18th for T-TH classes. I won’t be able to accept extra-credit after the fourth midterms, because I’ll be overloaded with all kinds of end-of-semester responsibilities).

No extra credit will be accepted after the fourth midterm. Do not ask for an exception to this policy, for none will be given. Finally, submit extra-credit in hard-copy only; electronic submissions (email attachments, etc.) will not be accepted.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Political Science 1 – Introduction to American Government (SPRING 2017)

Dr. Donald K. Douglas (“Dr. D.”)
Office: T2361
Office Hours: M-W 10:05am-11:05am; T-TH 10:20-11:50am
E-mail: ddouglas@lbcc.edu

Course Reading and Examination Schedule:

Introduction to Government:

George C. Edwards III and Martin P. Wattenberg, REVEL for Government in America: People, Politics, and Policy - 2016 Presidential Election -- Access Card, 17th Edition (2018),
chapter 1.
Larry N. Gerston and Terry Christensen, California Politics and Government: A Practical Approach, 
10th ed. (Boston: Wadsworth, 2001), chapter 1. (Available online.)
 
The Constitution:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 2.
 
Federalism:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 3.


*********** First Midterm Examination –  ************


Civil Liberties:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 4.
Nathan Heller, “The Big Uneasy. What's Roiling the Liberal Arts Campus?”, The New Yorker, May 30, 2016. (Available online.)

Civil Rights:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 5.
Andrew Moravcsik, "Fathers Who Serve as the Primary Parent: Why I Put My Wife’s Career First," Atlantic Monthly, October 2015. (Available online.) Public Opinion and Political Socialization:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 6.
Joel Kotkin, “The Golden State’s War on Itself,” City Journal, Summer 2010. (Available online.)

The Mass Media:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 7.


************ Second Midterm Examination – ************


Political Parties and the Party System:

Edwards et al., Government in America, chapter 8.
John Fonte, “Transformers,” Claremont Review of Books, October 19, 2016. (Available online.)

Campaigns and Voting Behavior:

Edwards et al., Government in America, chapter 9.
Victor Davis Hanson, “Trump and the American Divide,” City Journal, Winter 2017. (Available online.)
 
Interest Groups and the Pluralist System:

Edwards et al., Government in America, chapter 10.
Rebecca Traister, “The Future of the Left Is Female,” New York Magazine, January 23, 2017. (Available online.) 


*********** Third Midterm Examination –  ***********


Congress and Congressional Policy-Making:

Edwards et al., Government in America, chapter 11.

The Presidency:

Edwards et al., Government in America, chapter 12.


*********** Fourth Midterm Examination – ***********

Federal Bureaucracy:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 14.

The Federal Courts and Judicial Policy-Making:

Edwards and Wattenberg, Government in America, chapter 15.


********** Final Examination – (In Classroom) **********